the snag

scarred snag of tree in woodland

marked by cloven clamouring
insatiable satyrs and the pursuer, Pan
resistance etched in your scarring
dyed-in-the-wood maiden

hand-in-hand with nemesis goes
the worm through fleshy underside
stripping bark, sickening the rose, *
dryad choice of bride or suicide

masked foresters and their careless hands
armoured in dismembering chains
shall scatter to the meadowlands
sawdust and firewood remains

yet cloaked in woodland the snag persists
keeping solitary naked trysts
© Laura Granby 2015

With a bow and a nod to William Blake* , am joining in with Poetry Pantry on Sunday.

37 Comments on “the snag

  1. Whew. Vivid and intense. Especially the worm through flesh. I think what was most striking was the thought they were doing a good thing.

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    • thank you – worms are all part of the cycle though Blake took a less philosophical view!

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  2. I’ve read back through a few posts and would have left you more comments, but your comments are closed on all but the most recent post. Anyway, I’m absolutely giddy over having found you. I love your work.

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  3. “masked foresters and their careless hands”….no wonder there are so many “sick rose”s…

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    • took me a while to understand why the rose was sick!

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  4. Love the first stanza in particular and that final line, “keeping solitary naked trysts” is brilliant too 🙂

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    • thank you – its interesting how the stanzas change whilst I try to hang on to the thread 😉 needed that last stanza to hold it in place

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  5. yet cloaked in woodland the snag persists
    keeping solitary naked trysts

    Stellar closing lines 🙂

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    • stellar comment – thank you ❤

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    • apparently they can stand for years – deadwood still good!

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  6. Somehow the snag remains to tell us of our own folly as wells as myths and legends.. lot of stories there. Ha, the poetry writing on a Sunday was an interesting connection to what I had written,

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    • your comment resonates Bjorn – the snag is looking back at the folly of youth -p.s. really loved what you wrote for toads!

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  7. they have Midas touch – sadly it doesn’t end up turning to gold

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    • maybe the dust is gold for the next generation

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  8. You never cease to amaze me with your images and strong words here Laura….the poor snag left to the worms and perhaps another forester greedy for scarred wood.

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    • thank you Donna for your lovely comment – I fear the worms caused the snag- as gardener you might be interested in bark beetles

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  9. Your poem reminds me of the secret life of woods we find in so many myths and legends.

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    • trees are probably my most common muse too 🙂

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  10. I need to think about this a little longer. In the meantime, the poem and the photo are perfect companions. The tree is still standing, and the poem is paying it homage.

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    • yes Beth – a kind of triumph against the vicissitudes of myth and moment

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  11. Yes indeed, all there to be seen (or envisioned).

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  12. This piece certainly left me with more questions and shadows – perfect for those of us you love the forest of fairy tale thoughts…

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    • so true – the figure of the tree itself stirred the myth

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    • might have been the greek crisis which evoked Pan too!

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    • thank you! cannot help but wonder what will become of this rather fine piece of deadwood – perhaps a little pessimistic for the future so made the present more palatable

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    • – and you made my day – thank you!

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