Tangoed & Foxtrotting

Frequently I find inspiration in a given prompt and had intended yesterday to join Catherine’s word prompt ‘colour‘ which is a gift for any photographer.

For me however, colour is also one of the bigger challenges in photography as I find it quite tricky to handle. Never being quite satisfied with results I often seek sanctuary in monochrome.

Thus I thought I’d do some research to learn a bit more about colour photography – and before I knew it the day had passed but not before I had read

  • how light effects colour & how the camera sensor differs from our own visuals
  • the history of colour photography & Lumiere’s Autochrome
  • how to re-create Autochrome with an ICC profile in Photoshop

And today’s word challenge from Catherine is SLOW – and a lesson for yesterday too in that I might not have lost the day had I not tried to fit so much in so quickly. Did I mention I also signed up for an online Udemy course in ‘The Art of Finding light in Photography’?!

Slow Slow Quick Quick Slow – And now I learn there is a ‘Slow Photography Movement’ which I thoroughly concur with and am often aware of my rush to capture every moment and end up capturing a lot of dross but…

the real victim of fast photography is not the quality of the photos themselves. The victim is us. We lose something else: the experiential side, the joy of photography as an activity. And trying to fight this loss, to treat photography as an experience, not a means to an end, is the very definition of slow photography.”

” Step 1 in slow photography is spending a long time studying the subject. As one guide enjoins, “pay more attention to your subject than to your camera.”

That’s an order to actually use our eyes. It calls for consideration not just of what we think we see (a tree or a dog) but of the colours and shapes that present themselves.  “

I think this is one of the reasons I love photographing Suffolk so much – the pace is slow, the interruptions are few and far between and the scenery is seemingly empty, which make me look further into it.

Resources:
History of Colour Photography
Understanding color in Photography
Using ICC Profiles for Creative Colour Control + downloads

Udemy courses: The Art of Finding Light in Photography

The slow-photography movement


And so today I’m joining Catherine’s’ 366/2020 word challenge with Slow where she invites us to write, photograph or turn it into art


6 Comments on “Tangoed & Foxtrotting

  1. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed living on the Canadian prairies, you can’t get a much slower pace.

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  2. I love the idea of slow photography, I wonder if I can apply that same subject based approach to my writing? I need to make more time!

    I love your perspective on my 366/2020 challenge, I hope you can, slowly and colourfully, contribute to tomorrow’s ‘Wash’

    Like

  3. I practice slow photography when I’m home and out on my walks around here. It’s a little harder to do when I travel and time is a factor. I am slowly working my way through the book Zen Camera by David Ulrich which has exercises in slow photography.

    I love, love, love your photo of the tree and shadows. It’s gorgeous.

    Like

    • I should have known judging by the glorious images you share – that book sounds interesting and I intend to try and follow suit
      P.s. that tree was just begging for a portrait 🙂

      Like

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