A curse

Who would want to live in a world which is just not quite fatal?”
~ Rachel Carson ~”The Silent Spring”

In the footprint of the old barn
five new houses almost built
swallows due home from Africa
shall find no eaves

All along the forest tracks
creatures sound alarms
flee from our footsteps in a flash
of wing and fur and hoof

Then the roads come through
bulldozers never sleep
until a clearway sweeps clean
the forest floor

Nest, burrow, lair, flower
fungi, sapling, scooped
and scarified to dust

And we do not mind that deadly silence
above all engine noise

May all the man-eaters mount attacks
send in the snakes spitting venom
spiders with their fatal bites
multiply microbes in every element
every corner of the continents

Before we lay waste the earth

With this “Forest Traffic!”photo from Pulkit Kudiwal, Carrie has stirred our Sunday Muse

17 Comments on “A curse

  1. The pairing of the quote with the poem…a powerful shiver to begin the day. Between the weird, loud machine noises that startled all of us this morning and this poem I have to wonder when the forest will turn at bay to devour our homes.

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  2. Great descriptors and examples of our encroachment and how it disrupts the ecosystem. Humans used to be wise when they lived as part of it instead of what they do now. I also hope we are “taken out” as I love this place too much to consider its death 😦

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  3. Your poem struck a chord … I live that nightmare right now in my used-to-be smallish city. Well done.

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  4. This is as magnificent as it is sobering and deveastating Laura. Incredible poetry with a strong message!

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  5. A wake-up call, beautfully written.

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  6. kaykuala

    Then the roads come through
    bulldozers never sleep

    It all seems familiar in the development of any region. The pandemic has in some ways slow things up. It certainly is a curse, Laura!

    Hank

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  7. Something needs to happen to save what’s left. Your poem reminds me of a painting someone told me about, showing the Europeans arriving in ships, indigenous people holding out their hands in welcome and the animals all running away. They are apparently changing their behaviour now and becoming nocturnal to avoid us.

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