Japanese anemones

japanese_anenomes_texturedeffects.jpg
© LJG photoart; japanese anenomes

I brought you these.
Anemones. From the garden.
Better last year

blanched
blank faced
gone with the wind

my sentences tap out
coded conversation
– then a flicker
of recognition

Japanese
Comes up like thunder Outer china..”*

Kipling and plantswoman buried deep and accurate

Notes: Japanese anemones (A. hupehensis) are native to China but cultivated in Japan. 
*see “Mandalay” by Kipling

On this 6th anniversary at dVerse am squeezing in 44 words for the Monday quadrille “Flicker

23 Comments on “Japanese anemones

    • well spotted Frank – that was an accidental line that turned out just right

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  1. “my sentences tap out
    coded conversation
    – then a flicker
    of recognition”
    I especially love these lines!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ahh yes Lilian – speaking to the the elderly with memory loss is almost like sending morse code

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Isn’t it strange and wonderful what brings a person up out of the fog of forgetfulness! Minimalist, ink brush strokes on rice paper, this poem.

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  3. After reading your comments I realized what I missed in that first read-through. Such a poignant moment, one I am so familiar with. It’s those tiny things that bring surprises, flickers of awareness.

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    • it is a subtle reference Victoria – and touches tender spots

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  4. “blanched
    blank faced
    gone with the wind”—-This is so poignant. I have seen such a face in my life too. And it’s truly wonderful to gift such a person ‘a flicker of recognition’. A heartfelt poem Laura.

    Liked by 1 person

    • those flickers are all of that is left of connection p.s. ‘gone with the wind’ – anemones are also called windflowers

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    • glad the disjointed staccato tempo came across as intended Bryan!

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    • Thank you – the quadrille format fitted these sad encounters

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    • Thank you Paul – Guess consciousness is a flicker we can only hope has a regular current until switch off!

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    • Kipling’s one liner describes these Chinese windflowers well 😉

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    • that made my day – thank you 🙂

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