Communion

Illustration – Jackie Morris from the “The Lost Words” (2017)

In the churchyard, roving rooks return
summoned by a tail-spin end to this wintry season
noisily they stir age-old roosts, filch
from neighbours and two-by-two stand watch
over their untidy stacks

In the rook-roofed sycamore, a lattice work of leaf buds
rattles with raucous corvid calls
my spirits lift; a wind from the North-West scuds
body and soul through the old church doors
to seek communion

A simple poem to try and stir some creativity after a 6 week break but then anything goes at dVerse poets on Open Link Night hosted tonight by Grace

40 Comments on “Communion

  1. I do love the way you have managed to get the caws of the rooks into your poem. There is something somber yet elegant with a spring sign like those birds.

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  2. Such a gorgeous illustration, Laura – thank you for introducing me to Jackie Morris. I walk through the churchyard in a local market town twice a week, from the infant school to a little café for lunch, but sadly there are no rooks. I like the way your rooks stir age-old roosts noisily, ‘filch from neighbours and two-by-two stand watch over their untidy stacks’- beautifully observed. You’ve also captured their voices in ‘rattles with raucous corvid calls’.

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    • thank you for appreciating my observations Kim – I do study them especially after reading Cocker’s ‘Crow Country’
      P.S.the Morris/MacFarlane book is brilliant for children – when Lucas is older!

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  3. I love the rooks in the sycamore tree before communion. Perhaps they came for the service?

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  4. You might consider your words a simple poem Laura – but I consider them beautiful in their brevity, a picture well-painted, no more words needed.
    “In the rook-roofed sycamore” – lovely description.
    Anna :o]

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  5. Clever, vivid, great sense of place, rife with delicious alliteration; this piece is a pleaser; had to look up “corvid”, thanks.

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    • I cannot help but digest alliteration – I too think such sounds are delicious and many thanks for your comment

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  6. My favorite lines:

    “In the rook-roofed sycamore, a lattice work of leaf buds
    rattles with raucous corvid calls”

    Beautiful description of fine poetic write. 🙂

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  7. Wonderful language. These are my favorite lines,
    “In the rook-roofed sycamore, a lattice work of leaf buds
    rattles with raucous corvid calls”

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  8. How often they catch my eye and spirit too – beautifully captured here, Laura… Lovely writing…

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  9. This is absolutely stunning, Laura! 💝 I especially love; “a lattice work of leaf buds rattles with raucous corvid calls.” 🙂

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  10. What a stunning imagery and sounds, specially with these lines:

    wind from the North-West scuds
    body and soul through the old church doors
    to seek communion

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    • have never used ‘scuds’ in conjunction with a body but it fits as it has been very blustery here!

      thank you for hosting OLN Grace

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  11. Love the language and alliteration in this, the poem has a leafiness (if there is such a word) to it and a timeless Englishness!
    (looks like I failed spell check twice!) JIM

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  12. I won’t be long until those buds are beautiful green leaves and the crows will be up on the limbs talking about you going in and out of the church.

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